Gromia Sphaerica

Respectable dictionaries of the english language don't seem to list 'macrobe' among thier entries. Yet different sources on the internet that I've encountered do offer a wide range of definitions for this word. Appearantly none of them have gained official status.  Let's look at a few.

You might have heard of the Urban Dictionary; I don't know it well, but it looks like here the public may offer their own definitions of words from the vocabulary of 'urban slang'. Many entries are supposed to be funny, and many are indeed.


De Urban Dictionary (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=macrobe)

1. Macrobe

(1) A body-less head.
A head that has been severed in a sterilized sanitary severing device. And then begins to march over you.

See "March of the Macrobes" by Blaster the Rocketman

Macrobes! Here comes the heads! The chosen heads! of the bodiless Men!

 


The french do seem to know what a macrobe is, namely; 'One who has a very long life, who lives longer than the average life expectancy of his or her species.

Centre National de Ressources Textuelles et Lexicaleshttp://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/macrobe

MACROBE, MACROBIEN, -IENNE, adj. et subst.

(Celui, celle, ce) qui a une très longue vie, qui vit plus longtemps que la durée moyenne de vie de l'espèce considérée (d'apr. Méd. Biol. t. 2 1971).

 


Appearently a guy who calls himself a mad biologist is, much like myself, unclear on the definition of the word 'macrobe'.

Mike the Mad Biologisthttp://mikethemadbiologist.com/2008/11/22/gromia_sphaerica_its_a_coolmac/

[image of Gromia sphaerica]

"This is cool by itself, but I’m wondering what we call this. It’s clearly a single cell (which presents all sorts of interesting cellular biology questions), which means it would be a microbe. Yet it’s too damn big–there’s a species of frog which is smaller than this single cell.
So is it a macrobe?"